MRISAR's Research & Development Images

 

The following are some examples of our Research & Development of Beneficial & Responsible Humanitarian & Environmental devices throughout the years. To help fund our R & D we make simplistic versions of our Technologies to incorporate into world-class exhibits that we sell globally.

Our Research & Development Team consists of MRISAR's Founders John Siegel & Victoria Lee Croasdell Siegel and their two youngest daughters Autumn & Aurora Siegel, (who started helping with R & D when they were preschoolers). Together they have Designed & Fabricated the Earth’s Largest Selection of World Class Robotics Exhibits.

 

 

 

Rehabilitation Robotics; Artificial Sense of Touch & Facial Feature Controls

    Rail Robotics     Human Augmentation     Telepresence Robotics

Medical Electronics     Telemanipulators      Touch Sensitive Technologies

 

 





 

 

Rail Robotics; for applications in Industry, Adaptive Technologies for the disabled,

Hazardous Situations, Security, Agriculture, Exploration & Guidance.

 

 

Rail Robot Assistants

 

 

         

 

          

 

Chibi Rail Robot Assistant 36" high & Rail Robot Assistant  48" high. They can greet visitors and lead them through an area while talking and gesturing towards the surroundings. Its speech can be Bilingual. The advantage of this robot is that it does not take up floor space, or encumber and impede the travel of visitors. Instead it uses ceiling space to safety traverse it’s run, out of reach of the general public. They are a unique interactive robotic device that can be used in any environment that requires a host, tour guide or lecturer; like museums, centers, institutions and laboratories. We are currently working on upgraded versions that are telepresence & can pick up and transport small objects for applications in industry, adaptive technologies for the disabled and security. The host version of the device was recently prototyped and tested.

 

 

 

 

Rail Robotic Arms

 

 

              

 

        

         

 

                  

 

 

 

 

Dual Challenge The Robot Exhibit General Description; a dual 3-finger robotic arm exhibit. One robot arm is automated and the other is controlled by a user. The challenge is between the manual robot arm that is being controlled by a human and the automatic arm being controlled by the robot’s electromechanical brain. The automatic arm picks up a ball and takes it to a number of target locations one by one, while letting it roll back to the starting point between targets.

 

We have developed a variety of Telepresence versions that can pick up and transport small objects for applications in industry, adaptive technologies for the disabled, security, guidance and exploration.

 





 

Human Augmentation

 

 

                       

 

This R & D project is the creation and development of a set of “Wearable Dexterous Robotic Manipulators” that are based on our previous adaptive tech R & D work for the disabled. This project and our prior prototypes are based on augmentation of human capabilities. In this case augmentation that increases capabilities beyond normal human levels as opposed to restoring lost movements as in the issues of paralysis. The arms operate with a degree of useful precision by using a combination of our previously developed technologies. Specifically these include our version of “Facial Feature Control”, “Neck Movement Control”, “Artificial Touch” and “Status Indication through Direct Focus on the Retina”.  

This prototype addresses three issues;

1-      the necessity of multitasking with multiple limbs in vocational environments.

2-      helping workers in dangerous situations as this device can endure contact with material that human hands cannot.

3-      the necessity of having an easy to control, dexterous arm in absence of a limb.

 

Many times our own work has been limited by not having at least three arms. So we will be able to put this device to good use.

 

Our work in adaptive tech R & D and other subjects is world renowned and awarded, however so far we have had to fund it ourselves. Our premise is to appeal to a mass audience through the creation of an extreme robotic tool system via the two-arm interface and to attempt to drive funding to the project for a higher purpose.

 

 

 

 





 

Telepresence Robots; for applications in Industry, Adaptive Technologies for the disabled, Hazardous Situations, Security, Computer Interface, Agriculture, Exploration & Guidance.

 

We have been incorporating our own version of Telepresence into our Prototypes and World-class Robotic exhibits since 2001. Telepresence is ideal for applications in industry, adaptive technologies for the disabled, security, hazardous situations, guidance, computer interface, agriculture, exploration, etc.

 

 

 

Telepresence Robots

 

 

 

 

AUV & ROV  Exhibit. Operate a working model of an underwater robot. Try it in AUV mode which allows the robot to automatically performs some of the tasks and then try it in ROV mode for totally manual control operation. Place three items in the basket in a limited time interval for a successful mission. Place five in the basket in the same amount of time for an excellent mission rating. This exhibit has Telepresence, Telemanipulators and Automation aspects.

 

 

 

 

               

Above is a rough artistic rendering of our telepresence robot.

Magnus our Humanoid Telepresence Robot; Magnus is a low budget, simplistic, mobile, full fledged telepresence robot that will literally duplicate every basic movement that the operator makes. He is an experiment for applications in industry, adaptive technologies for the disabled, security and exploration. He addresses issues such as; 1- Using visual, tactile and force feedback and artificial touch for telepresence manipulation. 2- Creating human-like performance in telepresence robotics applications. 3- Full immersion telepresence with wearable haptic, multi sensor feedback. 4- Expressing emotion between humans and robots.

To help fund Magnus we have designed a simplistic version for sale to museums and science & technology centers called the "Humanoid Telepresence Space Robot" and are creating an educational web series called the "Mysterious Lab of Robotics" where MRISAR’s R & D Team will build Magnus on the show. Once brought to life he will participate as a cast member. Magnus will be portrayed as a humorous and engaging adaptation of technologies that we are actually developing for serious and beneficial applications.

 

    

"Humanoid Telepresence Space Robot" According to our research this exhibit is unlike any other on the planet. It is inspired by NASA’s Robonaut Telepresence. The robot in our exhibit presents a real platform for the museum visitor to experience the complexities of humanoid telepresence in a fun yet highly educational way. The robot is also a variation of a design that we are developing for an actual research and development project at our institute, which will be used in a number of beneficial applications for industry, the disabled and exploration. The telepresence controls for this exhibit are based on the basic layout of the ISS robot arm control joysticks as a further merit to the exhibit.

 

 

 

Telepresence Probe Robots

 

 

                                                     

 

 

 

 

 

Probe Robots "Challenge on Mars"  Probe Robots with Remote Control, Video Link & Specimen Retrieval! Planetary rover exploration race activity: The rovers are remotely operated via two control panels. The control panels afford the use of the rovers and also a rover’s eye view of the exploration via a miniature camera and monitor system.

 

 

 

 

Teleoperated Robotic Arms

 

 

 

 

 

 

                  

"The Last Mimzy" Movie Project:  These are the arms that we designed and built in two weeks and which appeared in several scenes with the scientist of the future in the 2007 sci-fi family movie "The Last Mimzy", a Newline Cinema, Avery Pix, and Hanna Rachael Production, film. Our telepresence operated robotics were depicted as helping the scientist from the future build the teaching toys which were a vital part of the story. The robotics were operated via telepresence controls from a remote location during the filming. We were told that they operated flawlessly and that their performance could not have been better.  Below Image is of Autumn & Aurora Siegel taking a break inside the crates for the Mimzy arms, prior to packing and shipping them. http://www.newline.com/properties/lastmimzythe.html  

 

 

 

 

 

 

                        

The Teleoperated Dual Robot Arm Exhibit consists of two exhibits that interface with each other, the Teleoperated Dual Robot Arm exhibit and the Teleoperated Control Counsel. These exhibits can be placed as far as 60 feet away from each other and still interact.

 

 

 

 

 

                                

Teleoperated 3 Finger Robot Arm Exhibit This Single Robot Arm Exhibit interfaces with a Teleopreated Control Counsel. The Teleoperated Arm Exhibit  has an electromechanical robot arm that measure approximately 39” long  from the tip of the fingers to the base of the shoulder pivot assembly. This arm is controlled directly from an attached Teleoperated Control Council through remote viewing. 

 

 

 

 

        

The Teleoperated Rail Robot exhibit features a thirty five inch long electromechanical robot arm mounted on a ten foot long rail system which allows the arm to glide from one end of the exhibit to the other.

 

 

 

 

 

            "Line of Sight Side"                      "Telepresence Video Monitor Side"

                                   

Space Dual Robot Arm Work Station. This exhibit features two electromechanical robot arms that measure approximately 39” long  from the tip of the fingers to the base of the shoulder pivot assembly.  The arms have pressure sensitive and end of travel limits, and can adapt to any arrangement of objects stacked in their path. The arms are made of light weight 6061 Aluminum and specially designed with travel and force limits. 

 

 

 

 

     

Teleoperated Planetary Probe The Teleoperated Planetary Probe is a new design which combines a number of exciting interactive elements with the science of  robotics and space exploration. The exhibit affords the museum visitor the opportunity of controlling a teleoperated robotic probe robot to survey an area of terrain and take samples and readings for analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

 





 

Telemanipulators; for applications in Industry, Adaptive Technologies for the disabled, Hazardous Situations, Security, Agriculture, Exploration & Guidance.

 

 

 

Telemanipulated Robots

 

 

 

               

 

                        

 

Planetary Probe Exhibit features an artificial terrain of a  hypothetical planet with a working probe robot which examines it's surroundings. The exhibit is  ideally suited for locations in the middle of the  floor as it is viewable from all sides through clear panels. This exhibit speaks it's directions when the Start Button is pushed.

 

 

 

AUV & ROV  Exhibit. Operate a working model of an underwater robot. Try it in AUV mode which allows the robot to automatically performs some of the tasks and then try it in ROV mode for totally manual control operation. Place three items in the basket in a limited time interval for a successful mission. Place five in the basket in the same amount of time for an excellent mission rating. This exhibit has Telepresence, Telemanipulators and Automation aspects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                               

 

Challenge Bots Each robot also has a number of electronically animated elements such as LED light arrays, which illuminate frosted and clear acrylic plastic elements such as crystals, columns and the domes. The columns also serve as a status indicator by lighting up in a particular order and color corresponding to the user’s movement selections. The robots and control panels also generate a number of interactive sound effects. In addition to these elements the control panels speak an introduction for the activity and prompt the user during the activity. For the two sports activities the control panels will also keep score and announce when a user wins.

 

 

 

 

 

           

Deven II is a demonstration robot designed to maneuver around a room and speak and respond to voice commands. Deven II's exterior opens for educational viewing of it’s interior. It is approximately 6 Ft. tall. It is powered by a gel cell battery at 12 V DC. Deven II is one of a number of robots being developed for museum demonstrations and exhibit floor use. It is a large robot intended for supervised demonstrations while in demonstration mode and for visitor us while in the activity area included. For exhibit floor use by museum visitors it now comes with a 10’ x 10’ activity area and railing mounted control panels included in the price. The original Deven prototype has entertained students for 15 years.

 

 

 

       

Cezar: Robotic Lion This demonstration robot is an unique educational experience in the guise of a large 4 ft. long autonomous robot designed to look like a mountain lion. The behavior design is based on Boolean mathematics that are configured to allow the robot to react to surroundings in ways that appear instinctive. The legs, torso and head are equipped with numerous sensors that react to environmental stimulus. The robot uses these sensors to judge distances and calculate each step. The design allows it to work for indoor and outdoor demonstrations. When needed a small robot arm and hand can emerge from a panel in it’s back to grasp small objects. It can understand spoken commands relayed through a wireless microphone and speak using a digitally controlled EEPROM device. The remote sensing attribute allows the robot to detect common things in it’s surroundings and the IR., Visual spectrum sensors and ultrasonics, relay obstacle and structural data. It operates on 12 VDC stored in a gel cell battery. It is not a mass production item.

 

 

 

 

       

Brutus: Robotic Canine   This demonstration robot is an unique educational experience in the guise of a large 4 ft. long autonomous robot designed to look like a mountain lion. The behavior design is based on Boolean mathematics that are configured to allow the robot to react to surroundings in ways that appear instinctive. The legs, torso and head are equipped with numerous sensors that react to environmental stimulus. The robot uses these sensors to judge distances and calculate each step. The design allows it to work for indoor and outdoor demonstrations. When needed a small robot arm and hand can emerge from a panel in it’s back to grasp small objects. It can understand spoken commands relayed through a wireless microphone and speak using a digitally controlled EEPROM device. The remote sensing attribute allows the robot to detect common things in it’s surroundings and the IR., Visual spectrum sensors and ultrasonics, relay obstacle and structural data. It operates on 12 VDC stored in a gel cell battery. It is not a mass production item.

 

 

 

Deven is a demonstration robot designed to maneuver around a room and speak & respond to voice commands and sounds. The above version of Deven was made in 1981 by John Siegel when he was 16. Deven’s exterior opens for educational viewing of it’s interior. Deven is approximately 4 Ft. tall. It is powered by a gel cell battery at 12 V DC. Deven is capable of a number of entertaining demonstrations such as: Following the instructor around a room, Following a beam of light. Avoiding obstacles, Picking up objects and following a path of tape around a room. The original Deven prototype entertained Michigan area students for many years. The updated version we are offering is also durable, but features many technological improvements.

 

 





 

MRISAR' North Dakota Humanitarian & Environmental, R & D Institute Prototype Environment

Featuring an “Interactive, Robotics, Technology, Art & Nature Center”

 

 

 

We purchased a 36,000sq.ft disused school on roughly 10 acres on the plains of North Dakota and are transforming it into a Prototype Environment for a low cost, low impact, self-sustaining, alternative energy powered, Humanitarian & Environmental Research & Development institute with Think Tank Invention labs, in a Zone 3b growing area. Our purpose is to invent and present responsible, low cost and easy to implement, beneficial humanitarian and environmental based technologies and methods that assist with social, ecological, sustainable and economic solutions. Accomplishing the prototype environment alone requires research & development of new technologies & improvement of existing technologies. To help fund our R & D part of the Institute will be used as an “Interactive, Robotics, Technology, Invention, Art & Nature Center” that will feature our standard line of World-class exhibits and Showcase our Private Collection of Innovative, Interactive Exhibits & Devices. It will also incorporate “Responsible Technologies”! Admission will be free to the underprivileged.

 

 





 

Rehabilitation Robotics; Artificial Sense of Touch & Facial Feature Controls

 

 

 

Wearable Dexterous Robotic Manipulators

 

       

2014. This R & D project is the creation and development of a set of “Wearable Dexterous Robotic Manipulators” that are based on our previous adaptive tech R & D work for the disabled. This project and our prior prototypes are based on augmentation of human capabilities. In this case augmentation that increases capabilities beyond normal human levels as opposed to restoring lost movements as in the issues of paralysis. The arms are designed to operate with a degree of useful precision by using a combination of our previously developed technologies. Specifically these include our version of “Facial Feature Control”, “Neck Movement Control”, “Artificial Touch” and “Status Indication through Direct Focus on the Retina”. It can use 3 or 4 facial feature movements to utilize 40 different basic functions which is expandable to hundreds, while relating it’s status through a visual indicator. In practical terms this design is easy to control and allows multitasking.

 

 

 

 

Rehabilitation Robotics; STRAC II

Symbiotic Terrain Robotic Assist Chair for Paralysis Victims.

 

           

STRAC II, was designed in 1999, however its completion date is dependant upon available funding. It is a streamlined, light weight version of STRAC.  STRAC, stands for Symbiotic Terrain Robotic Assist Chair.

STRAC II is forty percent lighter and has increased dexterity and modes of operation.  The ultimate design will literally form to the patients body, has self therapy applications and is light enough to easily handle.

 

 

 

Rehabilitation Robotics;

 Artificial Sense of Touch & Facial Feature Controlled Activity Center, For Paralysis Victims

 

          

 

    The device pictured above is a simple adaptive technology experiment. It is the first of a series of prototype activity centers for quadriplegic individuals, which is based on other prototypes we have developed that use facial feature movement to control a robot arm and or other device that can perform an action.  In this case the action is stacking a set of blocks by using nostril and eyebrow movements. In basic terms our  Facial Feature Technology uses 3 or 4 facial feature movements to utilize 40 different basic functions which is expandable to hundreds, while relating it’s status through a visual indicator console. In practical terms this design is easy to control and allows multitasking. An Adaptive Tech example; a person can easily control a five range of motion robotic arm on a robotic wheelchair base entirely through the use of moving their eyebrows and nostrils alone. This enables them to maneuver around a room in any direction, pick up and move objects, and print or draw on a vertical surface.
    In the near future a variety of more advanced activity centers will be produced and marketed. They will focus on finer movements, to move objects, draw and print. Other categories will follow as progress continues. Every effort will be made to develop methods to produce the devices reasonably, so that everyone who needs one can afford the device.
   
Besides the activity centers, our research and development still continues to incorporate facial feature movement into devices that will eventually allow quadriplegic individuals to become more independent. We are also developing low cost artificial limbs.
Click on the links to see the shop testing of our Rehabilitation Robotic; Facial Feature Controlled Activity Center prototype.  Video #1 and Video #2.

 

 

Rehabilitation Robotics; STRAC, Symbiotic Terrain Robotic Assist Chair; For Paralysis Victims.

Built in 6 weeks in 1999.

 

 

                          

 

 

                 

 

 

      

 

In 1999 STRAC was designed and built in 6 weeks. It was one of the select few Rehabilitation Robotic Prototypes that were demonstrated before the "International Conference On Rehabilitation Robotics" "(ICORR)" at Stanford University, in California.

STRAC, stands for Symbiotic Terrain Robotic Assist Chair.  Although STRAC, features some of its predecessors functions like artificial touch, artificial instinct and facial feature controlled actions, its improvements include Self Therapy. It may also be the most powerful wheelchair ever built. It’s base is an all terrain design that is strong enough to pull a car.  STRAC, is capable of climbing hills, curbs, and can tilt itself to compensate for the  slant of the ground, raise and lower the patient, speak to the user to inform about its current status, sense the patient’s facial movements & react to those movements by creating appropriate actions in its autonomous base and two exoskeleton arms and metal fingers. It also features an automatic navigation system that can “see”  in light or dark to assist in avoiding obstacles.  The chair sees using short bursts of ultrasonic sound bounced off objects to judge distance. STRAC also has an improved pen attachment that allows better reach and  more dexterity when drawing and writing.   In all,  STRAC has the potential for 40 different functions and is upgradeable to hundreds. The chair operates on 24 Volts. STRAC’s, wheels are unique triangular multi wheel devices, designed to climb uneven surfaces. The idea behind STRAC, is to give paralysis victims hands on interaction with their environment and the durability to challenge the outside terrain. STRAC, also sends information about it’s status to the patient by beaming it into the top of the lens of the eye. There is no need to look down at a control panel which had been a short coming of the original chair. STRAC’s  console is always a glance away and held in permanent focus to the patient’s eye.

In basic terms our  Facial Feature Technology uses 3 or 4 facial feature movements to utilize 40 different basic functions which is expandable to hundreds, while relating it’s status through a visual indicator console. In practical terms this design is easy to control and allows multitasking. An Adaptive Tech example; a person can easily control a five range of motion robotic arm on a robotic wheelchair base entirely through the use of moving their eyebrows and nostrils alone. This enables them to maneuver around a room in any direction, pick up and move objects, and print or draw on a vertical surface.
   

 

 

Rehabilitation Robotics; Artificial Autonomics & Robotic Interface, For Paralysis Victims;

built in 1998, in 2 weeks.

 

       

 

        

 

 

The robotic chair above can operate a five range of motion arm, move objects, draw on paper and maneuver around a room by sensing three facial movements. In theory and in practice the chair uses a custom designed control console and unique Boolean matrix to control fourteen separate functions.

This experiment uses only three facial movements to utilizes fourteen functions that control a five range of motion robotic arm and a mobile wheelchair base, while relating it’s status through a visual indicator console. This design is easy to control and allows multitasking. It maneuvers around a room in any direction, can pick up and move objects, and allow the user to print or draw on a vertical surface with primitive strokes. We condensed it’s circuits and power distribution by designing an unusual circuit which takes simple signals from sensors on a patient’s face and integrates them through a matrix of wires, relays and electronics which  relate Boolean logic and power distribution in both directions and on one set of common paths.

 

 

Rehabilitation Robotics; Artificial Autonomics & Robotic Interface, For Paralysis Victims;

                        

      

 

MRISAR R & D Team Members Aurora & Autumn Siegel playing with John Siegel’s early prototype robotic wheelchairs. Left; 1st prototype functions through neck movement only. Right; 2nd prototype functions through facial feature movement alone. In those days they had very little financial resources so everything was made with a high percentage of salvaged, recycled & surplus materials. 1998, Byron, MI.

 

 





 

 

Touch Sensitive Technologies;

 

John Siegel began experimenting with Touch Sensitive Technologies in 1975. He developed working finished prototypes by 1983. In 1991 he and his wife Victoria Croasdell Siegel began touring schools with their touch sensitive sound synthesizer prototypes to determine their success with students. The reaction to them was extremely positive, so when the Siegel's created MRISAR in 1993 they started incorporating John's technologies into exhibits that they have been selling to science centers world wide since 2000.

Below are some examples of exhibits we have incorporated our technologies into and marketed world wide.

 

 

 

   

 

 

                    

Touch Spectrum Regular Version

 

     

 Deco - Touch Spectrum Version

 

"Touch Spectrum"  Directions: Place one hand on each metal plate and the Touch Spectrum will react by creating sounds and light patterns.   Or place one hand on a metal plate and have another person place one of their hands  on the  other plate  and then  touch each of your remaining hands together. Try touching it with only a finger tip, then place your whole hand on the plate. Notice how the sound deepens as your hand covers more surface.   This occurs because your body is the conductor  for the electrical current and the more surface you cover the larger the  conductive pathway is. This increase in conductivity creates deeper tones. This exhibit was designed for public safety!!

Click here for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

The Super Photonic Pentiductor is the new and upgraded version of the Pentiductor (featuring both light and sound attributes). It is an exciting educational exhibit that delights both young and old.

 

It features a touch sensitive sound synthesizer (oscillator), which also produces light patterns in relation to how the touch plates are operated. It is of moderate weight for portability, easy to use and extremely durable. The five-sided design makes it adaptable to fill inner floor spaces and to work with both single users and groups.

 

To use the Super Photonic Pentiductor, a student or students touch the center large metal plate with one hand and one of the small outer plates with the other hand at the same time or optionally the students use the device together in a number of ways for other effects such as having one student touch the large plate and one touch a small plate and then in turn touching their remaining hands together. The device is also able to work with single arm operation should a user have a disability that prevents two-hand use or even with amputee limbs.

 

The device conducts a small electrical signal, which turns on an oscillator, that creates sounds. The electrical signal from the sounds also activates in varying degrees LED arrays of vibrant colors. As more students touch the plates the sounds develop deep tonal qualities that are reminiscent of musical notes and depending on how they use it other sound and light effects occur.

Click here for more information.

 

 

 

                                         

 

The Pentiductor is an exciting educational exhibit that delights both young and old. It features a touch sensitive sound synthesizer (oscillator), which produces sound in relation to how the touch plates are operated. It is of moderate weight for portability, easy to use and extremely durable. The five-sided design makes it adaptable to fill inner floor spaces and to work with both single users and groups.

 

To use the Pentiductor, a student or students touch the center large metal plate with one hand and one of the small outer plates with the other hand at the same time or optionally the students use the device together in a number of ways for other effects such as having one student touch the large plate and one touch a small plate and then in turn touching their remaining hands together. The device is also able to work with single arm operation should a user have a disability that prevents two-hand use or even with amputee limbs.

 

The device conducts a small electrical signal, which turns on an oscillator, which creates sounds. As more students touch the plates the sounds develop deep tonal qualities that are reminiscent of musical notes and depending on how they use it other sound effects occur.

Click here for more information.

 

 

 

 

         

 

        

A low cost, but very high quality portable mini version of one of our most popular touch interactive  science exhibits.

In on-location applications at schools, the response to our touch sensitive sound and light generators has been so great that the exhibits seem to practically disappear under droves of children who delighted in it's sound response to their touch, and how it can transfer it’s sense of touch-sound response between students when they shake hands. It has a very magical effect. Often one student will touch the other’s nose and the device will make a sound to their  amusement and interest.

 

It’s educational merits include; sound, light, electricity, electronics and electrical safety. It comes with a educational booklet covering aspects of education relating to each of the main educational points of interest and providing examples of experiments that can be done with the device.

 

The exhibit combines touch switch technology with a complement of tonal sound effects. To further accent the exhibit, it is equipped with LED lights in a faceted illuminated form on top of the device that relates in action to approximations of amplitude and frequency.

 

Click here for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

                     

 

 

 

"Human Conductor"a touch sensitive sound synthesizer (oscillator), which produces sound in relation to how the touch plates are operated.

Above: 2001; A group of students experimenting with the Human Conductor. They kept adding more students to see how many people the signal would pass through.

Directions:  Touch one plate with one hand and then touch the other plate with your remaining hand or touch one plate with one hand and then have someone else touch the other plate and then touch your remaining hands together.  When you hear a sound  you are conducting a small amount of electricity from a battery through your body to turn on an oscillator, which produces the sound.  To date the largest group to join hands with the Human Conductor is over 60 children at once and the signal went through successfully!!!

How it works!  A small electrical signal from a battery is sent to the disks and is conducted through your body.  By touching both disks you become the wire that completes the circuit allowing the signal to turn on a synthesizer. More users increase the conduction of the signal, which adds more charge to the signal, which in turn produces lower tones.  The picture above shows the exhibit working through over 40 children.  

Touch circuit technology will someday replace many of the mechanical switches currently in use, as mechanical switches are prone to break downs due to dirt contamination and wear.

Click here for more information.

 

 

 





 

Medical Electronics

 

 

 

Life Sign Monitors

 

                       

 

 

 

CARAS l

Apnea alarm with oscilloscope, heart and respiration alarms. 

ICARAS

Apnea monitor with adaptation for the disabled through voice synthesis and vibrating wrist transducer. Unit features high and low heart rate, respiration rate and temperature detection housed in a case size which is 6" x 6" x 3 1/2" = 1/3 the size of most commercially produced units. Continued work will lead to units the size of a pocket watch. 

NICAS

Monitor for detecting changes in metabolic rates as occurring during disturbances in sleep cycles. Designed to reduce nightmare induced sleep traumas.

 

 





 

Early Experiments with Robotic Prosthesis

 

 

 

MRISAR's Co-creator and R & D Team Member John Siegel

made this early arm and hand to experiment with Robotic Prosthesis when he was in his early teens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





We purchased a 36,000sq.ft disused school on roughly 10 acres on the plains of North Dakota and are transforming it into a Prototype Environment for a low cost, low impact, self-sustaining, alternative energy powered, Humanitarian & Environmental Research & Development institute with a Think Tank and Invention labs, in a Zone 3 growing area. Our purpose is to invent and present responsible, low cost and easy to implement, beneficial humanitarian and environmental based technologies and methods that assist with social, ecological, sustainable and economic solutions. Accomplishing the prototype environment alone requires research & development of new technologies & improvement of existing technologies. To help fund our R & D part of the Institute will be used as a World-Class “Interactive, Hands-On, Robotics, Technology, Invention & Nature Center” that will feature our standard line of World-class exhibits and Showcase our Private Collection of Innovative, Interactive Exhibits & Devices. It will also incorporate “Responsible Technologies”! Admission will be free to the underprivileged.





Balancing business with Philanthropic Ideals!  Developing & Promoting “Responsible” Technologies!




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