Space, Planetary, Movie, Industrial & Service Robotics

 

 

Space, Planetary, Movie, Industrial & Service Robotics; An Amazing Hands-On, Challenging, Technological Adventure! 5,000 to 6,500 sq ft. A complete rental of a show consisting of world class hands-on interactive exhibits, audio and video components, graphic panels, text, authentic technological marvels and research prototypes.  

Visual Aides:  In addition to the exhibit components described below (10) 4x8 foot full color graphics panels and an 8 ft. long hanging sign are included. The panels will provide a visual complement to each of the subjects presented in the show. The sign is mechanically animated. 

Floor plan:  A floor plan layout will be generated upon acceptance based on the measurements of the exhibition space provided by museum.

Maintenance:  Each exhibit comes with its own repair tool kit and an assortment of parts. Our exhibits are extremely durable and have low maintenance. 120 VAC regular three prong sockets are all that is required for operation.

Teacher’s Guide And Educational Website: Will be provided prior to exhibition as further educational reference along with promotional graphics.

Some Of The Many Educational Merits Of The Exhibition Relate To:  Electrical science, electronic science, electromechanical engineering, human-machine interfaces, alternative energy, energy conversion, communication technology, optics, optoelectronics, sensors, transducers, mathematics, sound synthesis, simple machines, robotics, artificial life, remote sensing technology, control systems, telepresence, industrial safety, industrial automation, security,  exploration, space, ocean, rehabilitation robotics, bionics, cybernetics, drafting, geometry, boolean algebra, flow charts and many more educational elements that will appeal to a very wide diversity of ages and technical knowledge.

 

For more information contact us.

 





 

The following are the exhibits included in this exhibition: 

 

Probe Robots "Challenge on Mars"

Probe Robots with Remote Control, Video Link & Specimen Retrieval!

           

                                               

 

 

Planetary rover exploration race activity: The rovers are remotely operated via two control panels. The control panels afford the use of the rovers and also a rover’s eye view of the exploration via a miniature camera and monitor system. The control panels keep track of available time left for exploration, the number of items found & retrieved and the opponents score. Each rover is equipped with a robot hand that can be used to grasp objects found on the terrain. The objects are then taken to a collection point. When the exploration challenge is over the objects are automatically randomly returned to the terrain by the collection devices which catapult the objects onto the terrain. These objects are made of soft materials and the collection device disperses the objects only within the terrain area.

 

Technical basics: Runtime no less than one day between charges. Radio control is to be set to different frequencies and codes for the rovers so that they can operate together without interference.  The control panel features a message repeater that reads the directions and also relates some of the status details of the exploration.  The control panel digital readouts show the status of the activity progress, time left and opponents progress.

 

Activity story: You are on a mission to explore another planet.  Your job is to use a rover to find samples. Your opponent is a fellow researcher. Find and secure more samples than the other researcher and you will be promoted to mission commander.

 

The goal of this exhibit is to familiarize the user with robotic manipulation in a planetary exploration environment, the basic elements of the robotic technology, and the relationship that even very complicated equipment has to the basis of “simple machines”. The telepresence operation setup for robotics also specifically relates to actual workstations in space and industry.

 

 

 

 

Dual Challenge The Robot Exhibit

           

 

This exhibit features three activities. 1- Operated by a museum visitor; 2 and 3- Operated by an instructor for educational demonstrations. 

 

General Description; a dual 3-finger robotic arm exhibit. One robot arm is automated and the other is controlled by a user. The challenge is between the manual robot arm that is being controlled by a human and the automatic arm being controlled by the robot’s electromechanical brain. The automatic arm picks up a ball and takes it to a number of target locations one by one, while letting it roll back to the starting point between targets. The challenge to the human user is to perform the exact sequence of movements as the automatic arm, without error, and at a faster rate. Size 72” high x 70” wide x 96” long.

 

Visitor Instructions To Challenge the Robot 

Read the instructions before pressing start: 

Do not press the unmarked blue buttons as they are only for special functions that instructors can use. 1- Press the start button. 2- Using the manual controls for the left robot arm, try to duplicate the actions of the robot arm on the right, as exactly and as fast as you can without errors. The automated robot arm on the right takes the ball to each target location, then lets it roll back to the beginning position. This process will continue until it stops on the last target and shuts itself off. To complete the challenge, you need to finish before it does.

 

Move the joystick on the left to control the left arm’s forward and backwards movements along the rail. Move the joystick on the right to control the elbow and wrist. The red button on top of the left joystick opens the fingers. The red button on top of the right joystick closes the fingers. To maintain a constant pressure grip the close button must be kept pressed while moving a ball. 

 

Regarding the reset button: If the robot had been interrupted during its automatic activity it might be necessary to push the reset button. Reset can also be used if you feel you want to clear the current game prior to completion.

 

Observations of the Challenge 

How far did you get by the time the robot arm finished the task? Did your method differ from the robots and if so did you drop the ball or impact the activity area? Since the arms are both the same and designed to go at the same speed why did the robot still win? Because it does not waste time in extra movements and it is not subject to indecision.  What if this was a dangerous life and death duty? Humans have their creative intelligence, but robots are ideal for repeated actions. Consider this with regard to the speed of this challenge. Robots can be designed to move at incredible speeds. The challenge of this exhibit would have been won by the automated robotic arm seconds after it started if we had not given an advantage to the human user by setting the robot arm speed at a rate comparable to a human’s reflex time. 

This arm was made to human proportions. Less bulky plastic versions of arms like this can be used as artificial limbs. While tougher arms can be mounted on mobile carts to help in dangerous situations, like fire fighting and bomb retrieval, as well as on Probes to other planets.  Presently robot arms are mainly used in factories, but this is changing rapidly with consumer robotics markets being developed.   

  

Instructors Directions To Operate  

Read the instructions before pressing start: 

Read the visitor instructions if you have not already done so. This set of instructions explains two activities that instructors can do for further educational merit. 

 

Activity One: After having a student do the Visitors Challenge the Robot activity, the exhibit is started again only this time quickly press a couple of the buttons to the right of the reset button. The first unmarked button to the right corresponds to the first target. The rest to the right of it correspond to the next targets. By momentarily pressing a couple of the target buttons in order before the arm is able to pick up the ball, the instructor can fool the arm’s automatic controls into thinking that the target was already done. This is because its short-term memory logs the switch signal. Now it will skip that spot.

 

Observations: This illustrates one principle of robotics. A robot is only as accurate as it’s sensory inputs.  In many automations failure to get a signal from a limit switch or sensor will result in a complete halt. How is this the same and how does this differ from real life? Humans can adapt more easily to change. Robots can be made to do this as well, but for the most part they are still dependant on preset norms.

 

Activity Two: Using the key, set the lock in position. This cuts the signal through the robots lower brain function and switches it over to the unmarked push switches on the left. The buttons will now access the basic movement sets for the arm, but not the higher brain functions. Now try being the higher brain. With practice it will be possible to run the arm through its motions like it does normally by pressing the buttons in the correct order and time duration. Even though this will work it will prove inefficient because sensory feedback cannot cue the arms action. Since the Human Instructor can see and logically interpret the results, it will still perform fairly well. 

 

Attention: Move the arm back on the track by using the four push button switches on the left of the reset button before turning the key to its original position. If you do not, the arm will not understand it’s position or call for the right movement sets until the key is turned again and the arm is moved to the back.

Regarding the reset button: If the robot had been interrupted during its automatic activity it might be necessary to push the reset button. Reset can also be used if you feel you want to clear the current game prior to completion.

 

 

 

 

AUV & ROV Exhibit

Operate a working model of an underwater robot. Try it in AUV mode which allows the robot to automatically performs some of the tasks and then try it in ROV mode for totally manual control operation. Place three items in the basket in a limited time interval for a successful mission. Place five in the basket in the same amount of time for an excellent mission rating. Approximant footprint of exhibit 40” wide x 40” deep x 76” high.

 

 

Humanoid Telepresence Space Robot

       

According to our research this exhibit is unlike any other on the planet. It is inspired by NASA’s Robonaut Telepresence.

 

The robot in our exhibit presents a real platform for the museum visitor to experience the complexities of humanoid telepresence in a fun yet highly educational way.

 

The robot is also a variation of a design that we are developing for an actual research and development project at our institute, which will be used in a number of beneficial applications for industry, the disabled and exploration.

 

The telepresence controls for this exhibit are based on the basic layout of the ISS robot arm control joysticks as a further merit to the exhibit. The telepresence controls can be placed up to 75 from the main exhibit case. 

 

The main case measurements are 10 ft deep x 11 ft wide x 72 inches high. The Telepresence control part of the exhibit is 6 ft wide by 3.5 ft deep x 72 inches high. The exhibit comes equipped with the control and video cables that must be placed between the main unit and Telepresence unit.

 

The activity the visitor is to perform is the repair of a satellite. Three different repair activities are provided. The controls and satellite are interactive. The controls keep track of the progress and after a predetermined time interval, the satellite and controls reset for the next user. 

 

 

Interactive Crystals

  

Interactive Crystals; Touch and Light Sensitive. Footprint 35” x 7.5’. An energetic realm of light, sound and mystery. Interactive electronics, touch playable sound synthesizers circuits and other wonders. The magic of electrical science is presented in this selection of interactive art that seems to come alive in response to the user. A magical fun way to express the sciences of electronics, electricity, photonics and other sensory elements based on the movements of particles and electrochemical interactions.

 

 

Space Dual Robot Arm Work Station

       

Basic Description: This exhibit features two electromechanical robot arms that measure approximately 39” long  from the tip of the fingers to the base of the shoulder pivot assembly.  The arms have pressure sensitive and end of travel limits, and can adapt to any arrangement of objects stacked in their path. The arms are made of light weight 6061 Aluminum and specially designed with travel and force limits. 

Line of Sight Side" Basic description of the activity: The museum visitor uses a robot arm to assemble a series of geometric shapes that are representative of space station modules and solar arrays. The arms feature five degrees of freedom and are usable by a very wide diversity of ages and skill levels. Inexperienced users will in most cases be able to pick up and maneuver objects in under a minute. With a bit of practice the parts can be assembled into more complicated structures. The parts that are assembled have magnets on them to hold their position. The magnetism is just enough to keep their location fixed during assembly, but weak enough  to afford the ease of removal as well. Degrees of freedom: Hand open and close, wrist horizontal CW-CCW, elbow up and down, shoulder CW-CCW, shoulder up and down. In addition to these controlled movements the arm also has a gravity leveled wrist.

Activity story: You are on a space mission.  Your job is to use a robot arm to help build and configure an international space station. Succeed and vital research can be done that will help to save the planet, bring people from across the planet together for a better collaborative future and create many life saving technological advancements.  

The goal of this exhibit is to familiarize the user with basic manual robot arm manipulation, the basic elements of the technology, the relationship that even very complicated equipment has to the basis of “simple machines” and the applications for robotic technology in space. 

"Telepresence Video Monitor Side" Basic description of the activity: The museum visitor uses a robot arm to assemble a series of geometric shapes that are representative of space station modules and solar arrays. The telepresence operated arm (operated via video link) has five degrees of freedom and are usable by a very wide diversity of ages and skill levels. Inexperienced users will in most cases be able to pick up and maneuver objects in under a minute. With a bit of practice the parts can be assembled into more complicated structures. The parts that are assembled have magnets on them to hold their position. The magnetism is just enough to keep their location fixed during assembly, but weak enough  to afford the ease of removal as well. Degrees of freedom: Hand open and close, wrist horizontal CW-CCW, elbow up and down, shoulder CW-CCW, shoulder up and down. In addition to these controlled movements the arm also has a gravity leveled wrist.

Activity story: You are on a space mission.  Your job is to use a robot arm to help build and configure an international space station. Succeed and vital research can be done that will help to save the planet, bring people from across the planet together for a better collaborative future and create many life saving technological advancements.  

The goal of this exhibit is to familiarize the user with basic manual robot arm manipulation, the basic elements of the technology, the relationship that even very complicated equipment has to the basis of “simple machines” and the applications for robotic technology in space. The telepresence operation setup for robotics also specifically relates to workstations in space and industry.

 

 

Simulated “Hot Cell Manipulator Work Station”

Challenge your skills! Can you insert all the Fuel Cell cylinders into their containers before the timer goes off creating a deadly level of contamination? 

(This simulator is designed for museum educational use. It is not for use with radioactive materials).

This exhibit challengers the users skills to place four fuel cells into their cylinders and cap them off before the timer goes off and a lethal radiation leak occurs! A count down timer display is near the control panel.

Prior to the timer going off, these theatric elements will occur:

1- a green light comes on and a vocal recording states your task.

2- a yellow light comes on and a vocal recording states that "Radiation levels are increasing."

3- a red light comes on and a vocal recording states that "Radiation has reached a hazardous level."

4- a siren begins to sound (volume is adjustable); and a vocal recording states that "Radiation has reached a fatal level. Evacuate all personnel."

5- white smoke will begin to fog the activity room (via a fog machine).

6- If the user fails to cap off all 4 fuel cells, then the timer will end the session. The session ends in two ways. Either the user is successful and a vocal recording states a congratulation; or the user is unsuccessful and a bright flash (via super bright LED's) emits from the activity area, as well as an explosive percussion that will be felt and heard (volume is adjustable).

At the end of a session the cylinders and caps are automatically ejected back onto the activity surface.

Voice recordings can be bilingual. We use Voice Playback technology for this option.

Hot cells are used in nuclear-energy and the nuclear-medicines industries. They are required to protect individuals from radioactive isotopes by providing a safe containment box in which they can control and manipulate the equipment required. Often manipulation is done via Manipulator arms. The main educational focus of this exhibit is to illustrate how manipulators can extend human capabilities to accomplish tasks such as handling waste material, experiments and in certain medical applications. The exhibit features two electromechanical robotic manipulators that measure approximately 39” long from the tip of the fingers to the base of the shoulder pivot assembly.  The arm has pressure sensitive and end of travel limits, and can adapt to any arrangement of objects stacked in it’s path. It is made of lightweight 6061 Aluminum. This arm is totally open framed for educational viewing and based closely on the proportions of an actual human arm. It is especially designed with safety features and force limits. To see examples of our arms click here.  Each arm has five ranges of motion and movement in 3 fingers.  Our arms have been used in exhibit robotics devices since 1993. The basic design for the arm has also been used in rehabilitation robotics experiments where it provided dexterity, durability and a somewhat human appearance.

 

 

Challenge Bots:

    

 

Basic description of the activity: Two robots measuring 3 ft wide x 2 ft long x 2 ft tall, in a 16 ft x 20 ft fenced in activity area with two podium like locations for the remote control panels. Frequency and codes will be very different for each robot so both can operate with no chance of stray signals from each other or other devices in the area interfering. Four ball and foam block type activity challenges will be part of the exhibit and interchangeable. Two will be a sports type contest between robots as human users guide them and two are basic dexterous training tasks.

 

 

Planetary Specimen Retrieval Training Robot Arm:

 

 

Basic description of the activity: The museum visitor uses a robot arm to  collect a series of rock samples from a simulated alien terrain. The items reset to the terrain when the time is up. The arm features nine degrees of freedom and is usable by a wide diversity of ages and skill levels.  Inexperienced users will in most cases be able to pickup and maneuver objects in under a minute.  The linkages on this arm and each of the many viewable components make this a very uniquely educational exhibit. Super bright LEDs will also accent the arm components and illuminate the artificial terrain to create more atmospheric quality. 

 

Activity story:  You are on a mission to another  planet. To explore remote and dangerous areas of the planet, robots are being used. The robots are being operated by scientists such as yourself in an effort to collect samples, learn about the environment, how the planet developed, available resources and possible sources of life.

 

The goal of this exhibit is to familiarize the user with robot arm manipulation in a planetary exploration environment, the basic elements of the technology, and the relationship that even very complicated equipment has to the basis of “simple machines”.

 

Technical basics:  Five Finger Robot Arm that measure approximately 39” long  from the tip of the fingers to the base of the shoulder pivot assembly. It has five degrees of freedom. They are represented in the independent movement of each finger and thumb, as wrist CW-CCW, elbow up and down, shoulder up and down and shoulder CW-CCW. 120VAC 60 Cycles. The arms have pressure sensitive and end of travel limits, and can adapt to any arrangement of objects stacked in their path. The arms are made of light weight 6061 Aluminum and specially designed with travel and force limits. 

 

 

Chibi Rail Robot Assistant

 

This 36" high Chibi Rail Robot Assistant can greet visitors and lead them through an area while talking and gesturing towards the surroundings. Its speech can be Bilingual. The advantage of this robot is that it does not take up floor space, or encumber and impede the travel of visitors. Instead it uses ceiling space to safety traverse it’s run, out of reach of the general public. The Chibi rail robot assistant is a unique interactive robotic device that can be used in any environment that requires a host, tour guide or lecturer; like museums, centers, institutions and laboratories.

The assistant robot consists of a rail system, power supply system and interactive robot. The robot’s main sections are transparent, affording an interesting and festive view into the interior, which is decoratively fortified with numerous bright light emitting diodes, which grace the printed circuit boards within. In operation the robot has the capability of introducing it’s self, introducing the environment area and taking visitors on a tour of the area.

The rail must be ceiling mounted with a series of appropriate brackets that are supplied. The preferred ceiling mounting height is no less than twelve feet. For extremely high ceilings the brackets must have extensions added to bring the robot down to an appropriate height for visitors to view. Please inquire about this if needed.

The Chibi robot assistant configuration enables the robot to traverse a span without the difficult effect of navigating around the public. The rail system is fitted with a series of trigger devices that cue the robots actions as it navigates. When a cue signal is detected, the robot accepts the detection as a  cue of its actions. Colored illumination of the domes and crystals switches at stops between Red, Amber, Yellow, Blue, Green and Violet. The speech element is stored on a SDHC card. The gesturing and pivoting of the robot is provided by a series of gear motors, mechanical and electrical limits.  The Robots travel can be started automatically on a timer or initiated at a push of a button when a visitor group arrives. The robot can be setup to start from each end or return to the beginning as it’s only starting point. The rail power is 12 VDC provided with a power supply which is adapted to the local utilities configuration. The primary for the power supply features a GFI protection system as an added safety measure. As shown, the rail guide on the robot is configured to lock the unit on the rail so that it is always secured properly.

 

 

Cybernetic Exhibit

Cybernetic Exhibit features Robotics In Artificial Limbs, Eyes, Ears And Other Types Of Interface Working models of an artificial limb, eye and ear. Actual sensor electrodes can be used by the visitor to operate an artificial hand and forearm. An oscilloscope shows the sounds patterns from the ear and the mechanics and electrical elements of hearing and the eye would be a working model of an image sensor array and display that could be tested with a series of test objects that the array would turn into a basic image.  An exhibit that deals with both wearable robotic elements for the disabled & Cybernetics (as in artificially created replacements for natural systems.) 35” deep x 7.5’ wide x 72” high.

 

 

Replicating Robots

Self Assembly Replicating Robots. Two robot caterpillars start out as a set of blocks and then assemble themselves. Once assembled a face on them lights up and they say a few words about the technology, respond to a set of pushbuttons that correspond to a set of questions and then return back to the individual block state for the next person’s turn.  35” deep x 7.5’ wide x 72” high.

 

 

 

Robot Spider Habitat

Dare To Tame, Challenge And Feed A Four Foot Diameter Robot Spider in its Metal Web Habitat. Exhibit is in a 9 feet diameter fenced in area. Visitors use a set of devices that look like flashlights to attract the spider's attention to try to bring it down to floor level. Then they push a series of buttons. One activates a device that makes the spider think it is getting food and the others buttons create sounds, which the spider reacts to. Reactions can be to recoil or to be drawn closer or to become agitated. The spider feeds on light so when the exhibit user presents light it is taken for food. Lights in the web can also be taken for food and the user can use the flashlight like devices to distract the spider from feeding on the web lights.

 

 

 

Set of two 3 Finger Robot Arms; mounted in an exhibit case with activity area for moving geometric objects (telepresence joystick operation). Arms are original robot arms that we made for a movie production by Newline Cinema called “The Last Mimzy”. Footprint 35” x 7.5’. 

          

 

 

Kiosk “Making Of The Exhibition”; with a 20” monitor and DVD that shows the making of the exhibition including details regarding the fabrication of many robotic components.  Footprint 48” x 35”.

 

 

Humanitarian & Environmental Robotics. Can robotic technology be used to help the disabled, save lives, protect people and clean up toxic materials? Footprint 35” x 7.5’.

 

 

 

 

 

Tools of the Robot Trade; exhibit featuring tools used to create robots and the explanations of their purpose. Footprint 35”x7.5’.

 

 





 

What Is Being Offered: A complete rental of a show consisting of world class hands-on interactive exhibits, audio and video components, graphic panels, text and authentic technological marvels and research prototypes suitable for 5,000 sq. ft. to 6,000 sq. ft.

Free shipping, setup assembly, disassembly & staff training included. Prices are based on North America Mainland Locations. For other locations please inquire regarding price and availability.

Regarding The Descriptions On the Following Pages:  In addition to the exhibit components described on the following pages (10) 4x8 foot full color graphics panels and a 8 foot long hanging sign would also be provided. The panels will provide a visual complement to each of the subjects presented in the show. The sign will be a mechanically animated.

Rental Costs & Shipping: Contact us for information.

Deposit:  A deposit plus signed contract to hold the dates is required.

Remainder of the fee:  To be paid in two parts with the first to be paid upon delivery and the last to be paid at the end of the rental period.

Insurance: Renter is to have insurance coverage for loss and liability for the duration of the exhibition. Loss coverage is for $541,300.00 total loss value and a suitable level of liability coverage.

Delivery And Departure: Load in can be 3 to 6 days ahead of the event if desired. Load out can be 3 to 6 days after the closing of the exhibit according to renter preference.

Floor plan: A floor plan layout will be generated upon acceptance based on the measurements of the exhibition space provided by museum.

Maintenance: Each exhibit comes with its own repair tool kit and a assortment of parts. Our exhibits are extremely durable and have low maintenance. 120 VAC regular three prong sockets are all that is required for operation.

Staff Training Details: At the time of delivery and setup we will present an educational presentation and demonstration for your staff and provide a reference guide and instruction manual for the educational and technical elements in the exhibition.

Teacher’s Guide And Educational Website: Will be provided prior to exhibition as further educational reference along with promotional graphics.

Some Of The Many Educational Merits Of The Exhibition Relate To: electrical science, electronic science, electromechanical engineering, human-machine interfaces, alternative energy, energy conversion, communication technology, optics, optoelectronics, sensors, transducers. mathematics, sound synthesis, simple machines, robotics, artificial life, remote sensing technology, control systems, telepresence, industrial safety, industrial automation, security,  exploration, space, ocean, rehabilitation robotics, bionics, cybernetics, drafting, geometry, boolean algebra, flow charts and many more wonderful educational elements that will appeal to a very wide diversity of ages and technical knowledge.

 





Foreign Rental is Subject to Approval, Feasibility & Additional Cost.  Please Contact Us for Special Terms.

See the video clip of our shop tests of our arms that were filmed in the movie! "The Last Mimzy"





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